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Like the art of portrait painting, the history of print making goes back many centuries and can be found in the Mesopotamian civilization in 3000 BC where round seals were used to make impressions into clay tablets.At the beginning of 14th Century Europe block printing was commonly practised as a method for printing religious garments. Then in the 15th Century paper became more available and print making started to replace the traditional hand drawn manuscripts. However the information age really took off in around 1439 with the invention of Gutenberg press in Germany.I have described the six main methods of traditional print making below my new series of dog lino-cuts.

NB: Prints shown here are examples only. Colour intensities and registration may differ from print to print.

For more  information call

portraits signature
or click Contact Me above

Dog portrait of Walter

Walter – original lino-cut
image size 15x15cm, black frame 25x25cm

framed £50.00
unframed £30.00

 

Dog portrait of smudge01_print2000

Smudge – original lino-cut
image size 15x15cm, black frame 25x25cm

framed £50.00
unframed £30.00

 

Dog Portrait of Ned01_2000

Ned – original lino-cut
image size 15x20cm, black frame 21x30cm

framed £50.00
unframed £30.00

 

Dog Portrait of BlossomLino_2000

Blossom – original lino-cut
image size 15x20cm, black frame 21x30cm

framed £50.00
unframed £30.00

 

Dog Portrait of TansyLino_2000

Tansy – original lino-cut
image size 15x20cm, black frame 21x30cm

framed £50.00
unframed £30.00

 

Dog Portrait of Millie01_lino_2000

Millie – original lino-cut
image size 15x20cm, black frame 21x30cm

framed £50.00
unframed £30.00

 

Dog Portrait of blackjack01_green_2000

Black Jack – original lino-cut
image size 15x15cm, black frame 25x25cm

framed £50.00
unframed £30.00

 

 

 

Relief Print Making

This is the oldest form of printmaking and involves carving an image or design into a flat surface, nowadays usually wood or lino. After being cut the wood or lino is rolled with ink and then pressed against paper to create a print.

Etching

Etching is a process of printmaking where an image or design is transferred to paper from a metal plate. The metal plate is prepared by strategically applying an acid-resistant material to its surface, then immersing the plate in acid. The exposed areas are then burnt away to a degree. The artist then applies ink to the grooves that have been burnt into the plate and presses a piece of paper against it under high pressure to transfer the design.

Drypoint

The drypoint method of printmaking is similar to etching. The difference is that the drypoint method does not involve burning the surface of a metal plate to create a design or image. Drypoint involves creating a print by carving into the surface of a metal plate then applying ink to the grooves that have been carved. This method creates a softer texture than etching does.

Lithography

This is a printmaking technique that dates back to the late 1700’s. This technique involves creating an image or design on a specially prepared surface, traditionally polished limestone, using a greasy substance. The artist then wets the surface with water and applies a oil-based ink. The ink is attracted to the greasy substance and repelled by the water. The ink is transferred from the limestone when pressed against paper.

Screen/Stencil Printing

This method uses a stencil fixed to a fine mesh screen. The screen is then placed over the paper, fabric, or whatever other object needs printing, and ink is squeezed through the areas of the screen not covered by the stencil. This process can produce dense areas of flat colour and often used for T-shirt printing and posters.

Monotype

In this form of print making Ink is applied directly to a plate of glass or plastic and then pressed against the paper. This technique makes it possible for artists to achieve a print where colors blend differently than they would have if applied directly to the paper with brushes.

 

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